Habari Za Nyumbani–on jambonewspot.com

Visit www.jambonewspot.com…..your community website for more

One on One with Casper: Devolution of Power

Posted by Administrator on April 4, 2012

Devolution of power pertains to a federalist system’s ability to the spreading of authority across different levels of government and thus reduces the spread and intensity of conflict (Watts, 1996: Ch. 3; Stewart, 1984:61-62).

The devolution of powers doctrine can be found in chapter eleven of the new Kenyan constitution.  One way Watts (1996) states that the three areas where devolution can be examined are legislative decentralization or division of legislative powers at each level of government, administrative decentralization or the assigned administrative responsibilities at each level of government.

Devolving power also helps to reduce conflict that is directed to one sovereign authority by distributing power to several sovereigns, for example, the constituency governments. Devolution of power increases inclusivity.

Baechler (2001) argues that inclusivity of the entire population, elites and non-elites, is essential for peace and development.  He argues that devolution of power is a structural approach that aids in attaining peace and development.  Every member of the society is included and recognized.  Devolution of power also brings governments closer to the people.  In the previous system the government was highly inaccessible, but with constituency governments it is easier for the public to petition government.  According to the Kenyan Constitution

Chapter Eleven devolution promotes democratic and accountable exercise of power, fosters national unity by recognizing diversity, enhances citizen participation and self-governance, and recognizes communities’ rights to manage their own affairs.  Also, it protects and promotes the interests and rights of minorities and marginalized communities, it ensures equitable sharing of national and local resources, it facilitates the decentralization of state organs in their functions and services from the capital of Kenya. In addition, it enhances, checks and balances the separation of powers.

Advertisements

2 Responses to “One on One with Casper: Devolution of Power”

  1. kwasi21 said

    According to this article and video ” The devolution of powers doctrine can be found in chapter eleven of the new Kenyan constitution”. This means its already in place to work to our advantage by spreading of authority across different levels of government and thus reduces the spread and intensity of conflict. Question, is there a system/higher authority in place to check the government? I think the common kenyan mwanachi suffers from lack of influencing power or the lack of proper representation.

    • Casper said

      Well, the mwanainchi is empowered because you are represented both at the local county level and at the national federal level. This means government has come closer to the people. You can send your grievances to the county assembly and governor. As a citizen you also have the power to recall, this is to remove elected public officials out of power before their term is over. Above all you have the vote. We have to start voting by merit and not by ethnicity.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
%d bloggers like this: